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Power Electronic Riddle No.3 – Fluorescent lamps electronic ballast

  • This topic has 2 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 2 years, 6 months ago by Sinnadurai Sripadmanaban.
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  • #497
    Larisochka

      What is difference between inductive and electronic ballasts performance in fluorescent lamps?

      What is difference between inductive and electronic ballasts performance in fluorescent lamps?

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    • #1935
      Hamid

        Fluorescent lamps can be operated on a conventional ballast (CB) and a starter. In this case the ballast functions as an inductive resistor; it comprises a lag ballast which consists of a laminate iron core and a copper-wire winding. Conventional ballasts are the cheapest kind of ballasts, but they do give rise to significant losses of energy due to the generation of heat. Low loss ballasts (LLB) are comparable to conventional ballasts, except that their core material is of a higher quality and they have thicker copper wires to reduce the loss of energy in the control gear. Low loss ballasts are only slightly more expensive than conventional ballasts, so they are frequently used in lieu of the latter. Electronic ballasts (EB) differ in weight, form and function from conventional, inductive ballasts. They consist of a filter, which prevents any reactive feedback onto the mains supply, a rectifier and a high-frequency inverter. Electronic ballasts have an integrated ignition device, which means that no additional ignitor is required. They ensure a flicker-free start and switch off automatically if the lamp is defective, which prevents the ignitor being activated time and again; switching and operation are as trouble-free as with incandescent lamps. Operating the lamps at 25

        #2483
        Sinnadurai Sripadmanaban

          Which kind of ballast generates less harmonics?.

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